© 2018 Earnest Hart Jr. LLC. All Rights reserved. 

Workplace Safety

For Adults

Workplace violence and harassment committed by employees or former employees has become one of the fastest growing problems in corporate America.Very few companies are prepared to handle any type of violent incident or threat in their company.The best way to confront conflict and anger in any environment is through knowledge and training.

 

Through this training your employees will have increased confidence and peace of mind knowing that they have the skills to react to a crisis situation. This training will reduce the risk of potential liability from injury, and even death to your staff and employees. 

Mental Strength at Work - Dealing with Conflict and Anger in the Workplace

Workplace violence committed by employees or former employees has become one of the fastest growing problems in corporate America. In the past few years there have been some deadly attacks that have been sensationalized by the media, but don’t represent the typical incidents that managers and employees encounter in the work place.  Very few companies are prepared to handle any type of violent incident or threat in their company.  The best way to confront conflict and anger in any environment is through knowledge and training.

Through this training your employees will have increased confidence and peace of mind knowing that they have the skills to react to a crisis situation. This training will reduce the risk of potential liability from injury, and even death to your staff and employees.   

Workplace Bullying Training

According to a poll conducted by Employment Law Alliance, Philadelphia-based Reed Group

surveyed 1,000 American adults on the topic of workplace bullying.

 

  • 45% said they have worked for a supervisor or employer they consider abusive.

  • More than 50% of American workers have been the victim of, or heard about, supervisors/employers behaving abusively.

  • Southern workers (34%) are less likely to experience an abusive boss than are theirNortheastern (56%) and Midwestern (48%) counterparts.

  • 64% believe an abused worker has the right to sue for damages.

 

Who are the Bully Bosses?

Bullies have a strong desire to be in control and exert dominance. According to organizational psychologist Laurence Stybel, Ph.D., of Boston's Stybel Peabody Lincolnshire & Associates, there are two kinds of bullies. Unsuccessful ones who don't last long at companies, and successful ones who are competent, but create problems.

Some bullies operate under the radar undetected because they project such traits as being intelligent, hard working, self-confident, competitive, and independent. Such traits may fill the job description, but they are devoid of empathy and compassion.

Are you working for a tough boss or workplace bully?

A tough boss treats all employees fairly, sets high expectations, and holds employees accountable. If the employee has a problem, a tough boss works with them to overcome barriers and engage in constructive dialogue.

A bully acts with malice and carefully chooses his victims. He creates roadblocks to derail success. His misuse of power and authority is relentless. Bullies are self-centered, emotionally restless, subjective, and focused totally on their own needs.

Bullied employees quickly become mentally and emotionally exhausted. This leads to physical illness, high absenteeism, loss of self-confidence, feelings of depression, social isolation, increased anxiety, sleepless nights and high employee turnover.